Agenda item

Performance Report (Dac.13.05.2019/3)

Minutes:

The Area Council Manager introduced the item, referring to the report circulated, which covered the period January to March, 2019.  Members heard how performance was generally good; however there were a small number of outstanding issues.

 

With regards to the contract held by Twiggs Grounds Maintenance, it was noted that the target for community groups supported had not been met.  However, Members heard how this was not an area of concern as many established groups did now not need support following previous assistance. In addition targets had been exceeded in every other area of the contract.

 

549 volunteers had been engaged by Twiggs over the year against a target of 180. A number of local businesses had been engaged to help maintain the area around their premises and 43 litter picks had been undertaken, leading to 153 bags of rubbish being collected.

 

Members also noted that the number of referrals to B:Friend was still rather low, and some received were inappropriate.  However, it was noted that the social groups were thriving, and more were in the process of being established.

 

Within quarter 4, there had been 14 requests for service, and 10 pairings had been brokered.  Volunteers had given 384 hours, with six new volunteers engaged and 28 enquiries from potential volunteers.  Members discussed how the team worked in partnership with a variety of partners and council departments.

 

It was recognised that the contract with Kingdom Security had come to an end on 31st March, 2019. The number of patrolling hours was delivered as per the contract, but there had been a significant drop in Fixed Penalty Notices issued, and therefore further discussion was taking place around evidencing the patrolling hours.

 

The meeting heard that the outgoing Housing and Migration Officer had started a new post in March, and a recruitment exercise was underway to fill this post.  It was acknowledged that this post was often filled on secondment as it was a short term service level agreement, it was suggested that this arrangement may wish to be reviewed in the future.

 

Within the quarter the Housing and Migration Officer had exceeded all targets, working proactively to deal with issues such as housing disrepair, waste on premises and fly tipping.   21 cases of fly tipping had been referred to the relevant Council department, and a significant number of contaminated bins had been dealt with.

 

With reference to those projects funded through the Dearne Development Fund, eight projects received funding in 2018/19 and the progress of these was discussed.

 

Members noted that CAB had been extremely busy with 128 clients seen in the previous two quarters.  Between January to March DIAL had delivered 24 sessions to 91 residents, and often the service had been oversubscribed.  Members noted the case study within the report and the impact of the service on the lives of those living in the Dearne.

 

Goldthorpe Development Group continued to have high numbers attending their social groups, with 239 attendances over the quarter and a high number of volunteers assisting at each event. The choir from Dearne Astrea Academy had attended one of the sessions, and both residents and students had enjoyed this.

 

With regards to Reds In The Community Members heard that 12 sessions had been delivered, with nine remaining. It was noted that there were a number of females attending, which was commended.

 

TADS had worked with 8 young people from primary schools in the area and 4 from the secondary school.  Whilst it was recognised that numbers quite low, it was recognised that this was due to the in depth work undertaken with many of the young people.

 

Members heard how the project delivered by DECV had worked with 58 individuals, and recently there had been a surge in people with those requiring support with their housing and paying their council tax online.  Many of those engaged were long term unemployed with health needs, and were suffering financial hardship.  Often these people were in their 50s/60s and no longer feel they have anything to offer the job market.  Support was given to each individual on a one-to-one basis.

 

RESOLVED that the report be noted.

Supporting documents: